The Pardu

The Iran Deal, The Push Poll And Conservative Political Operatives

In AAPOR., American Association for Public Opinion Research, http://schemas.google.com/blogger/2008/kind#post, Secure America Now (SAN), The Iran Deal, The Push Poll on July 31, 2015 at 9:30 AM

//pagead2.googlesyndication.com/pagead/js/adsbygoogle.js
(adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); var icx_publication_id = ‘14291’; var icx_copyright_notice = ‘2014 TheProgressiveInfluence’; //license.icopyright.net/rights/js/copyright-notice.js

Have ever been the victim of a “push pull?”  “Victim?”  Yes, your telephone rings, you answer,  you hear the name of an organization (the name sips by quickly without registering in your grey matter, the caller mentions the word “survey”; instant excitement. You have waited years for an opportunity to tale arty in a “political survey.” 

Push Poll     Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia                                                A push poll is an interactive marketing technique, most commonly employed during political campaigning, in which an individual or organization attempts to influence or alter the view of voters under the guise of conducting a poll.
If WIKI doesn’t work for you, try a more descriptive and real world definition from Dictionary Dot Com.
Push Poll     Dictionary Dot Com                          noun 1. a seemingly unbiased telephone survey that is actually conducted by supporters of a particular candidate and disseminates negative information about an opponent.   

Let’s solidify your knowledge push polling with information from the American Association for Public Opinion Research, AAPOR.

Push Poll     Dictionary Dot Com                          A “Push Poll” is not a Legitimate Poll

A so-called “push poll” is an insidious form of negative campaigning, disguised as a political poll. “Push polls” are not surveys at all, but rather unethical political telemarketing — telephone calls disguised as research that aim to persuade large numbers of voters and affect election outcomes, rather than measure opinions. This misuse of the survey method exploits the trust people have in research organizations and violates the AAPOR Code of Professional Ethics and Practices.

  


My experience with a “Push Poll.”

In 2010, the call came-in as stated above. The year was a non-General Election year (a key point). The caller started the call with what appeared as innocuous inquiries about state politics. After a brief period of maneuvering around about state issues, the caller moved to a question regarding support for the Democrat governor and how I felt about certain positions. OK, a hint, but still overcome with excitement about the forum and the developing survey, I was oblivious. The timing of the survey was within a month of a major rail car oil spill and fire on the West Coast. Questions ensued regarding the safety of oil derivatives and rail transport. Of course, the brain connected more with the derailment flames and damage, instead of …take a guess? Oil derivatives vs. pipeline. Pipeline. pipeline. Keystone XL popped into the brain like a tsunami. I had bitten on the push poll like an ungamely catfish: no sport at all.

I received the ultimate validation of a conservative poll taker when the survey taker went here: “Are you inclined to vote Democrat or Republican in this year’s general election.” The moment hit like a ten foot surf off Hawaii’s North shore! There wasn’t a General Election in the year of the survey, the General was over a year off.  Bam!  I informed the caller there was no General Election in the year of the call: silence from the caller. 

The remainder of the survey was accomplished with total consciousnesses of its origin, methodology and purpose. I was being used to provide talking point data for the coming political season and conservative issues like the KXL project. As the call came to a close, I asked the caller to alert her supervisors that the question about the “General Election” should be reviewed for veracity and authenticity. I offered the suggestion knowing, my time had been spent in a classic push poll.

If you have followed the news of late, right-wing media is reporting survey results claiming majority opposition to the Iran nuclear deal. The survey was conducted by Secure America Now (SAN) and Pat Caddell’s Caddell Associates. “Secure America Now” (SAN)? (If any survey taker identified as working for “secure American Now” I suspect my cognitive antennas would have gone full erection, and led to abstention from participation.)

Media Matters has published a piece on the survey and Right wing utility of the tool. 

We have embed the lede paragraph from the piece, If the lede doesn’t wet your palate, you should consider checking your political sanity, you could be susceptible to Judas goat activity from GOP operatives.

Media are citing a flawed poll claiming majority opposition to the Iran nuclear deal conducted by Secure America Now (SAN) and Pat Caddell’s Caddell Associates, without acknowledging that it contains a misleading question that falsely equates the Iran deal to the failed nuclear agreement with the North Korea agreement. Experts have explained that the Iran deal and North Korea agreement are vastly different, and SAN and Caddell have a history of advocacy polling and shady conservative advocacy campaigns.

A Conservative group essentially used a push poll – and mainstream outlets haven’t noticed.Posted by Media Matters for America on Thursday, July 30, 2015

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: